Cassien Inception

Posted by: Alex Norgate on June 25th, 2015

The past two weeks have rushed by with the swiftness of an alpine river. My brother whom I haven’t seen since last October recently made an impromptu visit; we did the usual site seeing along with walks through the Gorge du Verdon and two days fishing at Saint Croix. Needless to say, we didn’t catch a carp, but it was no less enjoyable sunning and swimming in vivid turquoise waters. I have also been searching for extra gigs in Nice, as I now need to raise money to pay my ex-partner for the investment she had in the camper I built us. All this has taken up a great deal of my time, and so I have not managed to wet my lines much of late.

Following my recent article in Fallon’s Angler Magazine, I received a complimentary email from novelist Dexter Petley. He enquired to see if I would be available for a spot of fishing commencing on the 12th of June, to which I agreed. When the time came to head for Carces, my partner Patricia and I left Nice a day early. It was great opportunity to check out lac du Saint Cassien, as it was on route to Carces. We found a discrete car park close to the water and spent the evening watching carp thrash the water to foam in the reserve at the bottom of the West arm.

After a good nights sleep in the camper, we woke to glorious sunshine beaming through the camper windows. In the trees surrounding us, the sound of birdcall warbled and chattered. We had just eaten breakfast when our friends Alex and Caroline (a couple from Germany living for carp fishing much the same as us) drove into our secluded car park by chance. They has just finished shooting a film for Korda France and looked like they could have done with some rest. We were delighted to see each other and spent the rest of the morning locked in conversation.

Some time over the course of the morning, Dexter rang to say that he to was at Cassien, and would come and meet us at the parking area by midday. He’d been to Carces for a recce and had decided not to fish there. It all panned out perfectly, and we spent several days fishing Cassien together.

Right from the off the weather was on our side. Huge bouts of low pressure pushed ferocious storms directly over our heads. Although it was bloody scary at moments, it did the fishing a world of good. Almost instantly we caught fish. On our first days fishing together Alex and I managed ten carp, including two supreme mirrors. Unfortunately the one I captured; a well propertied linear, managed to get out of the mat and swim through my legs before Alex could get a photo. I made a dash for it but slipped and landed on my arse in the water. Dexter was watching all this from the other side, and no doubt must have been chuckling to himself. Even I chortled at my lack of finesse.

Alex and Caroline eventually had to leave to continue work on their new book, and so Dexter and I were left to our own devices, which consisted of food, wine and good conversation. The carp continued biting but the action was not to come as thick and fast as the day before. To make matters worse I had a run of hook-pulls, so I decided to downsize my hookbaits, which seemed to remedy the problem.

Dexter stayed for a few days longer with me before heading off to the river Lot. During that time he caught a striking common from the plateau in front of the swim known as Kevin Ellis. Its intermeshing scales glimmered like shards of polished tigers eye in the warm evening glow. After Dexter left, it was impossible to occupy the swim I wanted due to the presence of others. I was far too exhausted from a week of early mornings and late nights to continue pushing myself, so I decided to fish evenings, which would give me much needed time to write. Unfortunately the fishing proved to be fruitless, other than giving me the opportunity to discover more of the lakes topography.

Having never fished Cassien before I assumed it would be an angling hellhole, but in actual fact I have found it to be quite the contrary. It is still possible to escape the hoards and seek isolation despite it being a popular location for holidaymakers and anglers alike. It also has a very diverse stock of carp; sublimely scattered mirrors, linears, two-tone commons equipped with huge tails, and brutish monsters to temporarily avail most from the afflictions of big carp angling.

Cassien’s attraction is notorious; but unfortunately like many other public waters it has become heavily regulated. The reasons for this vary; in the case of Cassien it is mainly down to a huge amount of litter left predominately by the angling/camping community’s. If I can say anything about this, I would like to encourage anglers to consider being more conscious with regard to the issue of littering. Cleaning swims of others rubbish, is a simple yet vital task. I’m sure many of us have cast aside a blunt hook or a length of mono with out a second thought; but unfortunately it’s this kind of unconscious action that contributes to degradation of the environment.

While on the topic I guess I should mention the issue of exposed human waste on public waters. I feel that a great solution to this is to carry a spade when on longer sessions.

As anglers we can aspire to acquire a greater intimacy with our surroundings, doing so not only makes us better angler’s, it also enables us to gain greater insight into ourselves. Somewhere along the line it has become expectable within the minds of people to disregard nature. Setting example, whilst remaining empathic towards others is by far the best approach to cultivate any kind of positive change for the future of angling and the preservation of nature as a whole.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

It was nice to spend time in the company of my brother for a couple of days.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

With the fishing proving slow, we spent time chilling out, swimming, and eating.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

The CG-3 Stove is a vast improvement to the old camp stove I used to use.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

My good friend Alex bends into a Cassien carp.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

I managed to get some great shots during some of Alex’s battles!

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

One of the Cassien Treasures that fell to Alex’s rods during his time spent fishing with us.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Playing my first Cassien carp.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Not a monster, but it got me off the mark at Cassien.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Out in the boat as the mist rises from the surface of the lake with the arrival of the suns’ first warming rays.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

A stunning Cassien mirror.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Electrifying!

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

I seem to have adopted a pet!

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Another of Cassiens lovely mirrors – it’s easy to see why so many anglers are drawn here year-on-year.

3 Responses to “Cassien Inception”



  1. Matt brocklehurst says:

    This place looks amazing – I’m traveling that way soon and would love to try fishing here. Can I just park up in my motorhome and fish or do you need a ticket/ Licence ?
    Would really appriciate your advice.

    Thanks



  2. Matthew Woods says:

    Nice read and good to see that you had a good session and that Cassien was kind to you.
    Can be such a difficult venue.
    Location so important.
    Well done and a good read.

    Matt



  3. Peter Parker says:

    How nice to see you guys exploring the world of adventures. Wish to visit with my best buddies too. Anyways thanks for sharing the beautiful images of the no man’s land. Last but not the least, the fish you are grabbing is way giant.

Leave a Reply





Cassien Inception

Posted by: Alex Norgate on June 25th, 2015

The past two weeks have rushed by with the swiftness of an alpine river. My brother whom I haven’t seen since last October recently made an impromptu visit; we did the usual site seeing along with walks through the Gorge du Verdon and two days fishing at Saint Croix. Needless to say, we didn’t catch a carp, but it was no less enjoyable sunning and swimming in vivid turquoise waters. I have also been searching for extra gigs in Nice, as I now need to raise money to pay my ex-partner for the investment she had in the camper I built us. All this has taken up a great deal of my time, and so I have not managed to wet my lines much of late.

Following my recent article in Fallon’s Angler Magazine, I received a complimentary email from novelist Dexter Petley. He enquired to see if I would be available for a spot of fishing commencing on the 12th of June, to which I agreed. When the time came to head for Carces, my partner Patricia and I left Nice a day early. It was great opportunity to check out lac du Saint Cassien, as it was on route to Carces. We found a discrete car park close to the water and spent the evening watching carp thrash the water to foam in the reserve at the bottom of the West arm.

After a good nights sleep in the camper, we woke to glorious sunshine beaming through the camper windows. In the trees surrounding us, the sound of birdcall warbled and chattered. We had just eaten breakfast when our friends Alex and Caroline (a couple from Germany living for carp fishing much the same as us) drove into our secluded car park by chance. They has just finished shooting a film for Korda France and looked like they could have done with some rest. We were delighted to see each other and spent the rest of the morning locked in conversation.

Some time over the course of the morning, Dexter rang to say that he to was at Cassien, and would come and meet us at the parking area by midday. He’d been to Carces for a recce and had decided not to fish there. It all panned out perfectly, and we spent several days fishing Cassien together.

Right from the off the weather was on our side. Huge bouts of low pressure pushed ferocious storms directly over our heads. Although it was bloody scary at moments, it did the fishing a world of good. Almost instantly we caught fish. On our first days fishing together Alex and I managed ten carp, including two supreme mirrors. Unfortunately the one I captured; a well propertied linear, managed to get out of the mat and swim through my legs before Alex could get a photo. I made a dash for it but slipped and landed on my arse in the water. Dexter was watching all this from the other side, and no doubt must have been chuckling to himself. Even I chortled at my lack of finesse.

Alex and Caroline eventually had to leave to continue work on their new book, and so Dexter and I were left to our own devices, which consisted of food, wine and good conversation. The carp continued biting but the action was not to come as thick and fast as the day before. To make matters worse I had a run of hook-pulls, so I decided to downsize my hookbaits, which seemed to remedy the problem.

Dexter stayed for a few days longer with me before heading off to the river Lot. During that time he caught a striking common from the plateau in front of the swim known as Kevin Ellis. Its intermeshing scales glimmered like shards of polished tigers eye in the warm evening glow. After Dexter left, it was impossible to occupy the swim I wanted due to the presence of others. I was far too exhausted from a week of early mornings and late nights to continue pushing myself, so I decided to fish evenings, which would give me much needed time to write. Unfortunately the fishing proved to be fruitless, other than giving me the opportunity to discover more of the lakes topography.

Having never fished Cassien before I assumed it would be an angling hellhole, but in actual fact I have found it to be quite the contrary. It is still possible to escape the hoards and seek isolation despite it being a popular location for holidaymakers and anglers alike. It also has a very diverse stock of carp; sublimely scattered mirrors, linears, two-tone commons equipped with huge tails, and brutish monsters to temporarily avail most from the afflictions of big carp angling.

Cassien’s attraction is notorious; but unfortunately like many other public waters it has become heavily regulated. The reasons for this vary; in the case of Cassien it is mainly down to a huge amount of litter left predominately by the angling/camping community’s. If I can say anything about this, I would like to encourage anglers to consider being more conscious with regard to the issue of littering. Cleaning swims of others rubbish, is a simple yet vital task. I’m sure many of us have cast aside a blunt hook or a length of mono with out a second thought; but unfortunately it’s this kind of unconscious action that contributes to degradation of the environment.

While on the topic I guess I should mention the issue of exposed human waste on public waters. I feel that a great solution to this is to carry a spade when on longer sessions.

As anglers we can aspire to acquire a greater intimacy with our surroundings, doing so not only makes us better angler’s, it also enables us to gain greater insight into ourselves. Somewhere along the line it has become expectable within the minds of people to disregard nature. Setting example, whilst remaining empathic towards others is by far the best approach to cultivate any kind of positive change for the future of angling and the preservation of nature as a whole.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

It was nice to spend time in the company of my brother for a couple of days.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

With the fishing proving slow, we spent time chilling out, swimming, and eating.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

The CG-3 Stove is a vast improvement to the old camp stove I used to use.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

My good friend Alex bends into a Cassien carp.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

I managed to get some great shots during some of Alex’s battles!

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

One of the Cassien Treasures that fell to Alex’s rods during his time spent fishing with us.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Playing my first Cassien carp.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Not a monster, but it got me off the mark at Cassien.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Out in the boat as the mist rises from the surface of the lake with the arrival of the suns’ first warming rays.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

A stunning Cassien mirror.

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Electrifying!

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

I seem to have adopted a pet!

Cassien Inception – Alex Norgate – Blog – Trakker

Another of Cassiens lovely mirrors – it’s easy to see why so many anglers are drawn here year-on-year.

3 Responses to “Cassien Inception”



  1. Matt brocklehurst says:

    This place looks amazing – I’m traveling that way soon and would love to try fishing here. Can I just park up in my motorhome and fish or do you need a ticket/ Licence ?
    Would really appriciate your advice.

    Thanks



  2. Matthew Woods says:

    Nice read and good to see that you had a good session and that Cassien was kind to you.
    Can be such a difficult venue.
    Location so important.
    Well done and a good read.

    Matt



  3. Peter Parker says:

    How nice to see you guys exploring the world of adventures. Wish to visit with my best buddies too. Anyways thanks for sharing the beautiful images of the no man’s land. Last but not the least, the fish you are grabbing is way giant.

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