It’s a Funny Old World

Posted by: Jim Wilson on November 22nd, 2016

It’s a funny old world sometimes, one minute everything can be running smoothly and life seem all rosy and good, then out of the blue, you get a jolt which sends everything crashing into chaos and turmoil. Well this very scenario played out in mine, and few close friends lives recently, which kind of sent everything off kilter for a while.

This year I had a spring back in my step when it came to my angling, the mojo was well and truly there and I couldn’t seem to put a foot wrong, particularly on the low-stock, snaggy, weedy wilderness of a pit I’d being fishing. My last blog finished on a big hit from the venue, which obviously left me seriously keen to get back and try and meet a few more of the lakes stunning inhabitants, well due to how well the previous trip had gone I’d decided to get back again as soon as possible, and six days later I was back walking the banks of the big windswept pit.

After a couple of laps of the lake on foot I was sure I’d seen a few fish tucked up on the end of a wind in a shallow-ish area of water, which to get in and out of, they would have to pass through an area of relatively open water, which can be fished from an island point that I’ve found to be a pretty good interception point when the fish move through. Soon enough I had the rods on three relatively familiar spots, two of which I decided to bait heavily from the boat, introducing a bucket full of hemp, pellet, whole and chopped boilies and a good helping of hemp oil added for additional attraction.

Soon enough I was tucked up under the Tempest Brolly, coffee in hand, watching for any further signs. After the disturbance of baiting-up and getting the rods out, all seemed pretty quiet out in front of me, and soon enough the last rays of the evenings sun had dropped over the horizon and I was heading for the sleeping bag. It wasn’t long before I was dragged from the comfort of the bag by a screaming alarm demanding my attention, and soon enough the first fish of the trip was secured in the folds of my Hydro Landing Net, and the session carried on like that really, with a steady flow of action coming my way. I couldn’t quite believe how productive the pit had been through the spring and early summer, it was so out of character that if it wasn’t happening to me I wouldn’t have believed it to be honest. Anyway, the second night of this 48-hour trip was special, really special, as just before dark I caught a stunning dark mirror carp of just over 31lb, and then just before first light I had another absolutely screaming take, which resulted in an obviously heavy fish wedged-up in solid weed, which saw me take to the boat to get above the fish to try and remove it from the monstrous weed bed it had wedged itself up in. Once above it, steady pressure on the braided mainline saw the fish slowly come free from the weed and soon enough I’d slipped the net under a great big mirror, which in the darkness I though was one a mate had caught four or five years previously, and one that I had dearly wanted to catch. Once back on dry land I realised it wasn’t that fish, but one which looked very similar, and what an awesome carp it was, weighing in at 39lb 4oz, and a proper looker at that.

31

A stunning dark old mirror of 31lb.

39lb 4oz

39lb 4oz, and a proper looker at that.

After this action packed trip, I was obviously keen to get back and arranged for a guesty for my best mate JP, soon enough the day of the trip arrived, JP was so excited, and when I sit back and think about it, it’s so easy to see why, the windswept, weedy snaggy pit is a haven, and an absolute one off, and one I’m privileged to have access too. Anyway, the trip for me turned into one of those you dream about, I opted to fish an area of open water which I had been working with bait over the few weeks leading up to the trip, and whilst I was out in the boat baiting up I saw what a can be described as a colossal mirror carp, hanging in one of the dense weed beds off the back of one of my favoured areas, it was massive, once baited up and back on dry land, I sorted a couple of fresh multi-rigs, balanced off the hook baits and flicked the rods out to the spot, all remained relatively quiet the first light, but early morning the following day, I had a belter of a take, and after an awesome battle I soon had another awesome mirror resting in the folds of the net, I recognised the fish as a big 30 I’d met a few weeks previously, I’m not one for repeat captures but this was such an awesome carp that I couldn’t be disappointed by it, and it was once I’d returned her after her moment of fame that I turned to JP and said the one I’d seen from the boat the previous day was probably 10lb bigger, J gave me one of those looks, we all know the one, and whilst having a celebratory brew, the re-cast rod ripped off again. Little did I know what I was attached to, but after a fairly straight forward battle I had a huge mirror carp in the net. Like a baby whale, all 48lb 14oz of mirror that I couldn’t place or recognise, other than to say it was without doubt the one I had seen from the boat the previous day.

playing 48

Little did I know what I was attached to…

48 in net

Once the fish was in the net, it was obvious it was a bit of a special one.

two man job

It was a two-man job, that was for sure!

48

Not surprisingly, I was over the moon with this one! 48lb 14oz of colossal mirror carp!

Following the mega result I was obviously really keen to get out again, but it was at this point then the jolt I talked about earlier hit me, and hit me so hard I didn’t know what day of the week it was, what am I going on about you’ll ask, but I received a call from my best mates wife, delivering some horrific news. JP, my lifelong best mate, had had an accident at home and suffered serious spinal injuries and was only breathing due to ventilator assistance being provided. It took a while to take it all in. Due to the nature of the injuries it was a week or two before I could visit him in hospital, but as soon as I was cleared to visit, I did, as often as I possibly could. The travelling between Scunthorpe and Oxford to see him meant my fishing time took a hit, but to be honest, with JP in the predicament he was, fishing was the last thing on my mind, and the thought of going filled me with guilt because J couldn’t get out and do what we both loved doing – chasing big carp.

Sadly, on the 10th September my best mate succumbed to his injuries and passed away. His passing shook me to the core. You see, JP had always been there, a voice of reason, an advisory, a laugh and a giggle, and just always there through thick and thin. Always on the end of the phone to share captures and blanks, and always there to keep the fire burning when I needed it, an exemplar of a best mate.

On the long drive back from Oxford late that night or early hours of the morning, whenever it actually was I made a promise to the big man that I would get back on the bank and into the groove of it all, and hunt some of those mega special carp we had talked about over the years as potential targets for the pair of us. Although initially I just decided to get the rods back out, get some fresh air and some rhythm back in my fishing and hopefully the fresh air would help clear the heavy dark clouds I could feel sat on my shoulders. So, a few days after JP’S passing I was back on the snaggy pit, with a good friend Darryl for company, not that I was much company that trip but it was what I seriously needed, so thanks Darryl I owe you one.

Anyway, that trip I opted to set up on the Island Point again, having let Darryl have choice of swims and he’d gone in the bay at the back of the island, soon enough I had my trusty Multi-Rigs out on Helicopter setups zipped-out to the now familiar spots and soon had a couple of kilos of mainlines finest out over the areas using the throwing stick.

Soon enough I was crashed out on the ELS catching up on some well overdue sleep, and around midnight that sleep was disturbed by the sound of my right hand rod in meltdown, all the takes on this lake are electrifying and this one was no different at all and I panicked all the way to the rod, son enough I had whatever I was attached to in close and away from the major dangers of the snags and by now ridiculously heavy weed beds, and all to soon whatever I had hooked was safely secured in the confines of my landing net. I grabbed the headtorch and flicked on the beam to be greeted by a gorgeous zip linear, not a massive fish by any stretch of the imagination but seriously welcome.

That was the total sum of the action for the first 24 hours of the session, and I spent most of the next day with the rods out the water trying to search out a few fish to fish for, by late afternoon, I’d decided that I was in the best spot and soon had the areas topped up with bait and fresh rigs back out to the marks, and soon enough the late summer sun had disappeared and darkness descended across the big old pit, it felt good that night and as I drifted off I could hear fish crashing amongst to the snags slightly right of where I was fishing, so all I could do was hope they would venture out onto my baited areas for a feast of carpy goodness.

Just after midnight I started getting the odd liner and knock telling me a few fish were present so I swung my feet out of the sleeping bag, lit the the stove and sat up in anticipation. At about 2.30 that morning, just as I was contemplating jumping back in the sleeping bag the middle rod absolutely melted off, and after a blistering first run which had me convinced I wouldn’t be able to stop it, I soon had what felt like a decent fish moving slowly in front of me. By now it’s head was covered in weed so the fight became more heavy and ponderous, and soon-enough I had a long-looking mirror carp wrapped up safely in the net. Once unhooked and on the scales, the needle shot down past the 30lb mark, settling at 30lb 10oz, I was chuffed to bits and popped the mirror in a Sanctuary Retention Sling, securing her in a deep marginal spot ready for some pictures at first light. Well, by the time first light came I had two mid-twenties sat in retention slings alongside the mirror! They were both stunning fish – a common which looked like a new penny, and a wonderful scaly old mirror that looked absolutely awesome. That was the end of the action for me though, and once the photos were done I packed the kit away and ventured back north. At this point I didn’t realise that would be my last trip of the year to the snaggy pit, but that’s how things have seemingly transpired.

30lb 10oz

30lb 10oz

Due to the travelling to visit JP and his upcoming funeral I decided to fish locally for the next few weeks, not long sessions, just dropping in and out when I felt like it really, and opted to return to my North Lincolnshire syndicate where I’d had an awesome result in May.

It was mid-September when I ventured back, and having spent a good while looking around I opted for a swim known as the Gorses, which had clearly not been fished much since I had last set foot on the banks of the lake. I decided to fish all three rods in open water, as most people fish the margins and island margin of the lake, and I always try and do something different. It won’t always get me loads of bites, but in my mind, doing something different will give me a better chance of catching the ones I really want. Anyway, I sorted the rods out relatively quickly and sat back to see what might happen. The first 24hrs were very quiet, and following a couple of laps of the lake and climbing a few trees to get a better view, I still didn’t hadn’t seen anything to make me want to move, so topped-up the spots and put the rods back out for the evening. It was around 5.30pm when the bite happened, my Dad had decided to pop down to see me, and we were sat having a cuppa when the middle rod urgently demanded my attention. As soon as I picked the rod up I knew I was connected to a decent fish. It just plodded slowly and used its bodyweight to try and resist the pressure I was applying to it, although soon enough I was guiding an obviously decent mirror over the waiting net cord. Initially I thought it could be Arnie, the king of the lake again, which I really didn’t want, but on peering into the net I realised it was the lakes second in command, an awesome mirror known as ‘Baldrick’, and at over 34lb I was absolutely made up. That was it action wise, but I made sure to bait up the spots before leaving. It was around a week or so before I could get back with the rods, so I made the decision to pop down once or twice in between, and if the lake was quiet enough then get some bait on the spots. Not massive amounts, but 3-4kg of chopped and whole boilies.

baldrick

Baldrick, the lakes’ second in command.

It wasn’t until a couple of days after JP’s funeral when I felt like venturing out again. My heart still wasn’t in it, but I knew he would want me to keep going, so I did. I opted to go in the Gorses, following the result in there recently and the fact I’d been keeping the bait going in.

Soon enough the rods were clipped-up and flicked out to the skyline markers and 10-15 Spombs of bait applied over each area, and as per the norm for this place. I sat back awaiting the hours of darkness to see if they decided to put a show on or not, and that they did. Several shows later – most of which were at slightly longer range than the spots I was fishing – the right hand rod ripped-off completely out of the blue, resulting in another of the lakes A-team, a fish known as the Johnsons Leather. Weighing in at over 26lb, she was an awesome carp and one of the few leathers I’ve caught.

john sons

The Johnsons Leather, 26lb+.

I couldn’t settle into my fishing for a few weeks so flitted about, and Bundy’s pit started to feature in my thoughts again, plus a shed load of work protecting a lake I’m involved in running from the threat of predation. But before I could start my autumn assault on Bundy’s I had a social trip to Linear Fisheries with my good mates Al Atkinson and Alex Grice. Hardwick was the venue of choice and I was even going to be able to sneak in an extra night – good angling in my mind! On arrival I found the lake to be fishing patchy to be fair, but I saw plenty of activity on the Hardwick side of the pool so set up on the spit between Hardwick and Smiths. I found myself an awesome little area in around 12ft of water, and put all three rods in the zone, yet the first 24 hours passed without any serious incident. I started to think of a move, but nowhere caught my eye to move to, so settled in for a second night in the original swim. Come dawn and after a second night of inactivity I was getting seriously anxious and started packing up ready for a move. With the barrow nearly loaded and just the rods and Tempest Brolly left in situ, the middle rod signalled a serious one-toner, and soon enough I was playing a clearly big carp in the clear gravel pit water. After a short fight, a big old set of shoulders broke the waters surface, and once in the folds of the net I could see a very big common looking a little annoyed with itself, all 35lb of it! Following such a result I decided to stay put for the final night of the trip, which was a mistake and I should still have moved, because that was the end of my action, but I couldn’t be disappointed with such a stunning carp.

hardwick 35

I got to try out the new N2 Chest Waders getting this stunning 35lb Hardwick common out and back into the lake.

Be Lucky

 

Jim

Leave a Reply





It’s a Funny Old World

Posted by: Jim Wilson on November 22nd, 2016

It’s a funny old world sometimes, one minute everything can be running smoothly and life seem all rosy and good, then out of the blue, you get a jolt which sends everything crashing into chaos and turmoil. Well this very scenario played out in mine, and few close friends lives recently, which kind of sent everything off kilter for a while.

This year I had a spring back in my step when it came to my angling, the mojo was well and truly there and I couldn’t seem to put a foot wrong, particularly on the low-stock, snaggy, weedy wilderness of a pit I’d being fishing. My last blog finished on a big hit from the venue, which obviously left me seriously keen to get back and try and meet a few more of the lakes stunning inhabitants, well due to how well the previous trip had gone I’d decided to get back again as soon as possible, and six days later I was back walking the banks of the big windswept pit.

After a couple of laps of the lake on foot I was sure I’d seen a few fish tucked up on the end of a wind in a shallow-ish area of water, which to get in and out of, they would have to pass through an area of relatively open water, which can be fished from an island point that I’ve found to be a pretty good interception point when the fish move through. Soon enough I had the rods on three relatively familiar spots, two of which I decided to bait heavily from the boat, introducing a bucket full of hemp, pellet, whole and chopped boilies and a good helping of hemp oil added for additional attraction.

Soon enough I was tucked up under the Tempest Brolly, coffee in hand, watching for any further signs. After the disturbance of baiting-up and getting the rods out, all seemed pretty quiet out in front of me, and soon enough the last rays of the evenings sun had dropped over the horizon and I was heading for the sleeping bag. It wasn’t long before I was dragged from the comfort of the bag by a screaming alarm demanding my attention, and soon enough the first fish of the trip was secured in the folds of my Hydro Landing Net, and the session carried on like that really, with a steady flow of action coming my way. I couldn’t quite believe how productive the pit had been through the spring and early summer, it was so out of character that if it wasn’t happening to me I wouldn’t have believed it to be honest. Anyway, the second night of this 48-hour trip was special, really special, as just before dark I caught a stunning dark mirror carp of just over 31lb, and then just before first light I had another absolutely screaming take, which resulted in an obviously heavy fish wedged-up in solid weed, which saw me take to the boat to get above the fish to try and remove it from the monstrous weed bed it had wedged itself up in. Once above it, steady pressure on the braided mainline saw the fish slowly come free from the weed and soon enough I’d slipped the net under a great big mirror, which in the darkness I though was one a mate had caught four or five years previously, and one that I had dearly wanted to catch. Once back on dry land I realised it wasn’t that fish, but one which looked very similar, and what an awesome carp it was, weighing in at 39lb 4oz, and a proper looker at that.

31

A stunning dark old mirror of 31lb.

39lb 4oz

39lb 4oz, and a proper looker at that.

After this action packed trip, I was obviously keen to get back and arranged for a guesty for my best mate JP, soon enough the day of the trip arrived, JP was so excited, and when I sit back and think about it, it’s so easy to see why, the windswept, weedy snaggy pit is a haven, and an absolute one off, and one I’m privileged to have access too. Anyway, the trip for me turned into one of those you dream about, I opted to fish an area of open water which I had been working with bait over the few weeks leading up to the trip, and whilst I was out in the boat baiting up I saw what a can be described as a colossal mirror carp, hanging in one of the dense weed beds off the back of one of my favoured areas, it was massive, once baited up and back on dry land, I sorted a couple of fresh multi-rigs, balanced off the hook baits and flicked the rods out to the spot, all remained relatively quiet the first light, but early morning the following day, I had a belter of a take, and after an awesome battle I soon had another awesome mirror resting in the folds of the net, I recognised the fish as a big 30 I’d met a few weeks previously, I’m not one for repeat captures but this was such an awesome carp that I couldn’t be disappointed by it, and it was once I’d returned her after her moment of fame that I turned to JP and said the one I’d seen from the boat the previous day was probably 10lb bigger, J gave me one of those looks, we all know the one, and whilst having a celebratory brew, the re-cast rod ripped off again. Little did I know what I was attached to, but after a fairly straight forward battle I had a huge mirror carp in the net. Like a baby whale, all 48lb 14oz of mirror that I couldn’t place or recognise, other than to say it was without doubt the one I had seen from the boat the previous day.

playing 48

Little did I know what I was attached to…

48 in net

Once the fish was in the net, it was obvious it was a bit of a special one.

two man job

It was a two-man job, that was for sure!

48

Not surprisingly, I was over the moon with this one! 48lb 14oz of colossal mirror carp!

Following the mega result I was obviously really keen to get out again, but it was at this point then the jolt I talked about earlier hit me, and hit me so hard I didn’t know what day of the week it was, what am I going on about you’ll ask, but I received a call from my best mates wife, delivering some horrific news. JP, my lifelong best mate, had had an accident at home and suffered serious spinal injuries and was only breathing due to ventilator assistance being provided. It took a while to take it all in. Due to the nature of the injuries it was a week or two before I could visit him in hospital, but as soon as I was cleared to visit, I did, as often as I possibly could. The travelling between Scunthorpe and Oxford to see him meant my fishing time took a hit, but to be honest, with JP in the predicament he was, fishing was the last thing on my mind, and the thought of going filled me with guilt because J couldn’t get out and do what we both loved doing – chasing big carp.

Sadly, on the 10th September my best mate succumbed to his injuries and passed away. His passing shook me to the core. You see, JP had always been there, a voice of reason, an advisory, a laugh and a giggle, and just always there through thick and thin. Always on the end of the phone to share captures and blanks, and always there to keep the fire burning when I needed it, an exemplar of a best mate.

On the long drive back from Oxford late that night or early hours of the morning, whenever it actually was I made a promise to the big man that I would get back on the bank and into the groove of it all, and hunt some of those mega special carp we had talked about over the years as potential targets for the pair of us. Although initially I just decided to get the rods back out, get some fresh air and some rhythm back in my fishing and hopefully the fresh air would help clear the heavy dark clouds I could feel sat on my shoulders. So, a few days after JP’S passing I was back on the snaggy pit, with a good friend Darryl for company, not that I was much company that trip but it was what I seriously needed, so thanks Darryl I owe you one.

Anyway, that trip I opted to set up on the Island Point again, having let Darryl have choice of swims and he’d gone in the bay at the back of the island, soon enough I had my trusty Multi-Rigs out on Helicopter setups zipped-out to the now familiar spots and soon had a couple of kilos of mainlines finest out over the areas using the throwing stick.

Soon enough I was crashed out on the ELS catching up on some well overdue sleep, and around midnight that sleep was disturbed by the sound of my right hand rod in meltdown, all the takes on this lake are electrifying and this one was no different at all and I panicked all the way to the rod, son enough I had whatever I was attached to in close and away from the major dangers of the snags and by now ridiculously heavy weed beds, and all to soon whatever I had hooked was safely secured in the confines of my landing net. I grabbed the headtorch and flicked on the beam to be greeted by a gorgeous zip linear, not a massive fish by any stretch of the imagination but seriously welcome.

That was the total sum of the action for the first 24 hours of the session, and I spent most of the next day with the rods out the water trying to search out a few fish to fish for, by late afternoon, I’d decided that I was in the best spot and soon had the areas topped up with bait and fresh rigs back out to the marks, and soon enough the late summer sun had disappeared and darkness descended across the big old pit, it felt good that night and as I drifted off I could hear fish crashing amongst to the snags slightly right of where I was fishing, so all I could do was hope they would venture out onto my baited areas for a feast of carpy goodness.

Just after midnight I started getting the odd liner and knock telling me a few fish were present so I swung my feet out of the sleeping bag, lit the the stove and sat up in anticipation. At about 2.30 that morning, just as I was contemplating jumping back in the sleeping bag the middle rod absolutely melted off, and after a blistering first run which had me convinced I wouldn’t be able to stop it, I soon had what felt like a decent fish moving slowly in front of me. By now it’s head was covered in weed so the fight became more heavy and ponderous, and soon-enough I had a long-looking mirror carp wrapped up safely in the net. Once unhooked and on the scales, the needle shot down past the 30lb mark, settling at 30lb 10oz, I was chuffed to bits and popped the mirror in a Sanctuary Retention Sling, securing her in a deep marginal spot ready for some pictures at first light. Well, by the time first light came I had two mid-twenties sat in retention slings alongside the mirror! They were both stunning fish – a common which looked like a new penny, and a wonderful scaly old mirror that looked absolutely awesome. That was the end of the action for me though, and once the photos were done I packed the kit away and ventured back north. At this point I didn’t realise that would be my last trip of the year to the snaggy pit, but that’s how things have seemingly transpired.

30lb 10oz

30lb 10oz

Due to the travelling to visit JP and his upcoming funeral I decided to fish locally for the next few weeks, not long sessions, just dropping in and out when I felt like it really, and opted to return to my North Lincolnshire syndicate where I’d had an awesome result in May.

It was mid-September when I ventured back, and having spent a good while looking around I opted for a swim known as the Gorses, which had clearly not been fished much since I had last set foot on the banks of the lake. I decided to fish all three rods in open water, as most people fish the margins and island margin of the lake, and I always try and do something different. It won’t always get me loads of bites, but in my mind, doing something different will give me a better chance of catching the ones I really want. Anyway, I sorted the rods out relatively quickly and sat back to see what might happen. The first 24hrs were very quiet, and following a couple of laps of the lake and climbing a few trees to get a better view, I still didn’t hadn’t seen anything to make me want to move, so topped-up the spots and put the rods back out for the evening. It was around 5.30pm when the bite happened, my Dad had decided to pop down to see me, and we were sat having a cuppa when the middle rod urgently demanded my attention. As soon as I picked the rod up I knew I was connected to a decent fish. It just plodded slowly and used its bodyweight to try and resist the pressure I was applying to it, although soon enough I was guiding an obviously decent mirror over the waiting net cord. Initially I thought it could be Arnie, the king of the lake again, which I really didn’t want, but on peering into the net I realised it was the lakes second in command, an awesome mirror known as ‘Baldrick’, and at over 34lb I was absolutely made up. That was it action wise, but I made sure to bait up the spots before leaving. It was around a week or so before I could get back with the rods, so I made the decision to pop down once or twice in between, and if the lake was quiet enough then get some bait on the spots. Not massive amounts, but 3-4kg of chopped and whole boilies.

baldrick

Baldrick, the lakes’ second in command.

It wasn’t until a couple of days after JP’s funeral when I felt like venturing out again. My heart still wasn’t in it, but I knew he would want me to keep going, so I did. I opted to go in the Gorses, following the result in there recently and the fact I’d been keeping the bait going in.

Soon enough the rods were clipped-up and flicked out to the skyline markers and 10-15 Spombs of bait applied over each area, and as per the norm for this place. I sat back awaiting the hours of darkness to see if they decided to put a show on or not, and that they did. Several shows later – most of which were at slightly longer range than the spots I was fishing – the right hand rod ripped-off completely out of the blue, resulting in another of the lakes A-team, a fish known as the Johnsons Leather. Weighing in at over 26lb, she was an awesome carp and one of the few leathers I’ve caught.

john sons

The Johnsons Leather, 26lb+.

I couldn’t settle into my fishing for a few weeks so flitted about, and Bundy’s pit started to feature in my thoughts again, plus a shed load of work protecting a lake I’m involved in running from the threat of predation. But before I could start my autumn assault on Bundy’s I had a social trip to Linear Fisheries with my good mates Al Atkinson and Alex Grice. Hardwick was the venue of choice and I was even going to be able to sneak in an extra night – good angling in my mind! On arrival I found the lake to be fishing patchy to be fair, but I saw plenty of activity on the Hardwick side of the pool so set up on the spit between Hardwick and Smiths. I found myself an awesome little area in around 12ft of water, and put all three rods in the zone, yet the first 24 hours passed without any serious incident. I started to think of a move, but nowhere caught my eye to move to, so settled in for a second night in the original swim. Come dawn and after a second night of inactivity I was getting seriously anxious and started packing up ready for a move. With the barrow nearly loaded and just the rods and Tempest Brolly left in situ, the middle rod signalled a serious one-toner, and soon enough I was playing a clearly big carp in the clear gravel pit water. After a short fight, a big old set of shoulders broke the waters surface, and once in the folds of the net I could see a very big common looking a little annoyed with itself, all 35lb of it! Following such a result I decided to stay put for the final night of the trip, which was a mistake and I should still have moved, because that was the end of my action, but I couldn’t be disappointed with such a stunning carp.

hardwick 35

I got to try out the new N2 Chest Waders getting this stunning 35lb Hardwick common out and back into the lake.

Be Lucky

 

Jim

Leave a Reply