Amazing Orchid Session for Maslen

Posted by: Trakker on February 8th, 2016

It’s no secret that Eastenders actor Scott Maslen, who plays Jack Branning in the long-running BBC soap opera, is an accomplished angler who can certainly hold his own when it comes to putting them on the bank. After notching up a string of good results last year from Walthamstow Reservoirs’ 2 & 3, Bluebell Fisheries’ Swan Lake and The Quarry in Essex, Scott’s return to ‘Enders meant his busy filming schedule would rule out any fishing, at least for the following few months. However, a dyed-in-the-wool carp angler can’t be separated from his rods for too long, and a small window of opportunity opened-up for Scott to squeeze in a bit of angling time on Oxfordshire’s Orchid Lake, and he was sure to make the most of it, as we’re sure many of you will have seen on social media recently!

Speaking to Scott during the final day of his session, he gave us this run-down of the session, in his own words:

“Basically, I’m back working, and I didn’t think I’d be fishing again any time soon, but a sneaky little window opened up, which meant I wouldn’t be working for two weeks, which was a bit of a bonus, to say the least.

I started my time off by sneaking over to Walthamstow to see Gaz and Adam from Trakker, who were out filming some video for Trakker’s Spring/Summer 2016 releases, and although Gaz and Adam had caught a couple each, I didn’t really feel it was happening for me over there this time, so I went home with full intentions of just relaxing and chilling out for a few days. Those plans had to be put aside though, when out of the blue I received a call the next from my mate Kev Hewitt, who wanted to know if I fancied joining him for a couple of nights at Orchid Lakes, where two of his mates had been enjoying a bit of success that weekend, with a few fish between them up to 38lb+, and they’d offered Kev the chance to jump in the double swim they were sharing after they had finished their session. Of course, I jumped at the chance! I hadn’t seen Kev for a while after sharing some truly memorable sessions with him during the autumn, so it would be good to catch up again, especially with a chance of putting one or two on the bank.

The following morning, which was a Sunday, we arrived at the lake to find that despite their earlier success, the action had seemed to slow down somewhat now. After going over the rules and chatting about the stock with owner Marsh Pratley, we decided it was about time we went over and gave the boys a nudge with the hope of them vacating the swim and giving me and Kev a go! Carp fishing is a funny old game though, and the swim had started to come back to life that morning, with a few fish nutting their heads out in the area before the action started again for them, with fish falling to both lads’ rods. Of course, they stretched their session out as long as they could, with me and Kev having to wait patiently until Bart and Lee couldn’t possibly stretch their session out any longer, and we eventually managed to get our rods in the water just after darkness had fallen.

Even though it was still January, the weather seemed cock-on for it, and after the action we’d witnessed earlier, I decided I was going to put a fair bit of bait out, and put out around 15 Spombs of maggot and corn on a small spot, followed by two Stiff Hinge Rigs, baited with little hi-viz barrel-shaped Mainline pop-ups, which when you looked at them in the edge amongst a bit of the mix I was using, looked just like a couple of grains of corn, sitting just above the free items.

My third rod was fished as a roamer out to my left, with a small PVA mesh bag of stinky pellets to hopefully attract the attention of any passing carp. As chance would have it, as I was clipping the bobbin on I felt the line being pulled through my fingers, and sure enough, when I lifted the rod I found I was attached to a small (compared to the average stamp of fish in the lake) common of around 16lb, who must have charged in and snaffled my hookbait just seconds after the bag had melted! I was made-up with the quick bite, and put that rod back out again, and received another bite in the night from that spot, but the main spot hadn’t produced a bite.

The next day brought with it clear skies and a lot of wind, which over the next few days proved to be a precursor to action for me, particularly if that wind got up in the afternoon, before calming down going into dusk.”

Going on to talk about the fish he caught, Scott said:

The long-and-short of it is, that I’m still in a bit of a daze. It worked out that I was having around three fish a day over the five days I was there, including four doubles, five 20s, three 30s including a fish known as Cluster at 38lb 12oz, and a 40!

Scott Maslen Orchid Session – News – Trakker

Scott with Cluster at 38lb 6oz.

These fish are stunningly beautiful fish, I mean absolute minters, and to make the session that little bit more special, I even got to name one! Traditionally on Orchid, if an angler catches a fish and that fish weighs over 30lb for the first time, Marsh allows the angler to name the fish, so when I found out that the 32lb mirror I’d landed was a new 30 for the water, I duly named it ‘Bungle’!

Scott Maslen Orchid Session – News – Trakker

Bungle!

It was just a red-letter session for me. To be out at the end of January/beginning of February in what were incredibly up-and-down conditions, was just amazing.”

Talking about how the session panned-out, Scott was quick to point out that the bite times seemed to be very specific, with each day bringing two clear windows in which the carp appeared to go on the feed:

“It seemed to be a dawn-and-dusk kind of water, or at least those were the times when the fish preferred to feed in my swim. During one of these dusk periods, I had an absolute peach of a mirror at 29lb in the net, and was just admiring it’s winter colours and classic Oxfordshire carp looks, when the other rod out on the main spot tore off! An epic battle with what was clearly a large carp then followed, and after an encounter with a red bed, and a few knee-trembling rolls close-in, I was lucky enough to land the mirror known as Tommo’s in the same net at 40lb 2oz! Absolute carnage!

Scott Maslen Orchid Session – News – Trakker

A stunning example of a typical Oxfordshire carp at 29lb+.

Scott Maslen Orchid Session – News – Trakker

The biggest of the session for Scott, an awesome old mirror known as Tommo’s.

I couldn’t have asked for a better session. I return back to work next week, and I won’t have the luxury of a few nights here-and-there at my disposal, so I’m just so made up to have got the carping ‘fix’ I was hankering for”

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Amazing Orchid Session for Maslen

Posted by: Trakker on February 8th, 2016

It’s no secret that Eastenders actor Scott Maslen, who plays Jack Branning in the long-running BBC soap opera, is an accomplished angler who can certainly hold his own when it comes to putting them on the bank. After notching up a string of good results last year from Walthamstow Reservoirs’ 2 & 3, Bluebell Fisheries’ Swan Lake and The Quarry in Essex, Scott’s return to ‘Enders meant his busy filming schedule would rule out any fishing, at least for the following few months. However, a dyed-in-the-wool carp angler can’t be separated from his rods for too long, and a small window of opportunity opened-up for Scott to squeeze in a bit of angling time on Oxfordshire’s Orchid Lake, and he was sure to make the most of it, as we’re sure many of you will have seen on social media recently!

Speaking to Scott during the final day of his session, he gave us this run-down of the session, in his own words:

“Basically, I’m back working, and I didn’t think I’d be fishing again any time soon, but a sneaky little window opened up, which meant I wouldn’t be working for two weeks, which was a bit of a bonus, to say the least.

I started my time off by sneaking over to Walthamstow to see Gaz and Adam from Trakker, who were out filming some video for Trakker’s Spring/Summer 2016 releases, and although Gaz and Adam had caught a couple each, I didn’t really feel it was happening for me over there this time, so I went home with full intentions of just relaxing and chilling out for a few days. Those plans had to be put aside though, when out of the blue I received a call the next from my mate Kev Hewitt, who wanted to know if I fancied joining him for a couple of nights at Orchid Lakes, where two of his mates had been enjoying a bit of success that weekend, with a few fish between them up to 38lb+, and they’d offered Kev the chance to jump in the double swim they were sharing after they had finished their session. Of course, I jumped at the chance! I hadn’t seen Kev for a while after sharing some truly memorable sessions with him during the autumn, so it would be good to catch up again, especially with a chance of putting one or two on the bank.

The following morning, which was a Sunday, we arrived at the lake to find that despite their earlier success, the action had seemed to slow down somewhat now. After going over the rules and chatting about the stock with owner Marsh Pratley, we decided it was about time we went over and gave the boys a nudge with the hope of them vacating the swim and giving me and Kev a go! Carp fishing is a funny old game though, and the swim had started to come back to life that morning, with a few fish nutting their heads out in the area before the action started again for them, with fish falling to both lads’ rods. Of course, they stretched their session out as long as they could, with me and Kev having to wait patiently until Bart and Lee couldn’t possibly stretch their session out any longer, and we eventually managed to get our rods in the water just after darkness had fallen.

Even though it was still January, the weather seemed cock-on for it, and after the action we’d witnessed earlier, I decided I was going to put a fair bit of bait out, and put out around 15 Spombs of maggot and corn on a small spot, followed by two Stiff Hinge Rigs, baited with little hi-viz barrel-shaped Mainline pop-ups, which when you looked at them in the edge amongst a bit of the mix I was using, looked just like a couple of grains of corn, sitting just above the free items.

My third rod was fished as a roamer out to my left, with a small PVA mesh bag of stinky pellets to hopefully attract the attention of any passing carp. As chance would have it, as I was clipping the bobbin on I felt the line being pulled through my fingers, and sure enough, when I lifted the rod I found I was attached to a small (compared to the average stamp of fish in the lake) common of around 16lb, who must have charged in and snaffled my hookbait just seconds after the bag had melted! I was made-up with the quick bite, and put that rod back out again, and received another bite in the night from that spot, but the main spot hadn’t produced a bite.

The next day brought with it clear skies and a lot of wind, which over the next few days proved to be a precursor to action for me, particularly if that wind got up in the afternoon, before calming down going into dusk.”

Going on to talk about the fish he caught, Scott said:

The long-and-short of it is, that I’m still in a bit of a daze. It worked out that I was having around three fish a day over the five days I was there, including four doubles, five 20s, three 30s including a fish known as Cluster at 38lb 12oz, and a 40!

Scott Maslen Orchid Session – News – Trakker

Scott with Cluster at 38lb 6oz.

These fish are stunningly beautiful fish, I mean absolute minters, and to make the session that little bit more special, I even got to name one! Traditionally on Orchid, if an angler catches a fish and that fish weighs over 30lb for the first time, Marsh allows the angler to name the fish, so when I found out that the 32lb mirror I’d landed was a new 30 for the water, I duly named it ‘Bungle’!

Scott Maslen Orchid Session – News – Trakker

Bungle!

It was just a red-letter session for me. To be out at the end of January/beginning of February in what were incredibly up-and-down conditions, was just amazing.”

Talking about how the session panned-out, Scott was quick to point out that the bite times seemed to be very specific, with each day bringing two clear windows in which the carp appeared to go on the feed:

“It seemed to be a dawn-and-dusk kind of water, or at least those were the times when the fish preferred to feed in my swim. During one of these dusk periods, I had an absolute peach of a mirror at 29lb in the net, and was just admiring it’s winter colours and classic Oxfordshire carp looks, when the other rod out on the main spot tore off! An epic battle with what was clearly a large carp then followed, and after an encounter with a red bed, and a few knee-trembling rolls close-in, I was lucky enough to land the mirror known as Tommo’s in the same net at 40lb 2oz! Absolute carnage!

Scott Maslen Orchid Session – News – Trakker

A stunning example of a typical Oxfordshire carp at 29lb+.

Scott Maslen Orchid Session – News – Trakker

The biggest of the session for Scott, an awesome old mirror known as Tommo’s.

I couldn’t have asked for a better session. I return back to work next week, and I won’t have the luxury of a few nights here-and-there at my disposal, so I’m just so made up to have got the carping ‘fix’ I was hankering for”

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