When Your Luck’s In!

Posted by: Jim Wilson on July 15th, 2016

Following on from the capture of Arnie I was obviously keen to get out and try and capitalise on any run of luck I might have been experiencing, and my next set of days off saw me pointing the van south on the A1, heading in the direction of the notoriously deep Bundy’s pit. Now Bundy’s is an awesome place with an awesome stock, but boy they can be tricky carp to tempt if they don’t want to play ball. I arrived late-afternoon and spent a good journey of the drive down on the phone to my good mate Bailey, properly punishing him for the latest info.

On arrival I had a quick look round and a cuppa with the man himself, and then set about getting sorted. I went in a swim which has been kind to me in the past, and soon enough had the rods out on familiar ground, all three fished over a spread of Essential Cell and Hybrid.

It was knocking on dark by the time I was sorted so I sat near the rods taking in the atmosphere. It’s always nice to be back somewhere after a bit of a break, especially if you’ve been away since winter and when you come back its all green and lush.

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

Settled in The Boards.

The first night passed without event on the buzzer front, although I had forgotten how much the deep pit carp could show if they wanted to, and they didn’t half put on a show during the early hours, with probably 20 shows in front of me in an hour or so window. I’ve learnt by now not to get too carried away by this, or despondent if you don’t get a bite, because that’s the Bundy’s carp and its just how they behave some days.

By late morning I’d had enough so reeled the rods in then topped up the spots before heading off around the pit looking for signs of inspiration. It wasn’t long before I found fish, and where they were persuaded me I didn’t need to move swims, so a couple of hours later I had the rods back on the spots, about half an hour after casting I’d just clipped the bobbins on after letting the lines settle properly when the right hand rod pulled up tight and the rod tip slammed round. Shortly after, I had a gorgeous upper double common in the net. Nothing else happened until the early hours of the morning when a typical Bundy’s 20lb common graced my landing net. That was it for that session, and soon enough I was heading back to the deep pit for another 48hr session. This time I arrived early morning, not quite first light but early enough, and started to look round. It was Sunday morning so there were a few on and I decided to look and listen for a good while before making a decision.

There were fish all over the place so I got a couple of rods out in the swim I fished the trip before to see if I could buy a quick bite, but after a couple of hours I realised i was in the wrong place, and moved a couple of swims down to my left, again just fishing a couple of rods whilst I tried to figure out what was happening and what the fish were up to. Soon enough I realised another move was on the cards so loaded the X-Trail Galaxy Barrow and headed to Second Point, which was on the other side of the lake to the double swim where I was at the time. Once again, a couple of rods went out, however I couldn’t settle in the area so again went looking for them.

I moved once more, only this time back in the direction I had came from, settling on a swim called The Boards. It was now about half-three in the afternoon, and I’d arrived at half-five in the morning, it was baking hot and I was in my fourth swim of the day I was starting to feel it, but soon enough I had the rods out and the Tempest Brolly up and sorted for the night. The night was quiet, but around half-five the following morning the left hand rod pulled-up tight and a typical deep-water battle followed. The fight was slow and ponderous until eventually a great big common gulped for breath on the surface. Once in the folds of the net I knew she was a big girl, but didn’t have a clue which one it was, and eventually found out she was one that had been on the missing list for five years, and weighing-in at over 36lbs she truly was an awesome carp.

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

36lb of stunning deep-pit common!

That was that for that trip, and the following week the deep pit carp decided to spawn, so I left them to their copulation and ventured back to the snaggy pit, which is almost like my sanctuary. I love the place, the challenge and the atmosphere of the place are truly mesmerising.

After another stupidly early alarm clock following a busy week at work I was soon caffeine-fuelled and making my way towards the lake. Soon enough I was on lap three of the 50-60 acres of water, and having not seen a thing I returned to the van and dug out the brew kit, made a cuppa and sat and watched. After another hour-or-so of looking and a few cups of tea I decided to go afloat in search of them. I try not to use the boat if possible this time of year because the carp are very active and alert, and I find they spook quite easily when they are like this, so try and find them from the bank instead, but with nothing to go on I felt I had no option but to don the lifejacket and go afloat.

After a couple of laps of the likely areas from the boat I eventually found a group of fish, only 6-10 but that was enough for me, so I moored up to watch them. They were using a set of snags that it was impossible to fish to, so I eventually settled on a swim the other side of the snags and before sorting any of the gear I got the throwing stick out and baited each area I was looking to fish with a kilo-or-so of boilie.

I then sorted the rods, tied new rigs, attached new leadcore leaders and balanced off the hookbaits before flicking the rods to the spots. Soon enough I had the rods out and left them to let the braided line settle before attaching the bobbins. The rods were in the water about an hour before I went to clip the bobbins on when the right-hand rod literally pulled-up tight out of my hands! After an uneventful fight I soon had an absolute beast of a mirror safely in the folds of the landing net. Once the self-takes were done the scales revealed a very healthy weight of just over 38lb. What an awesome start to the session.

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

Over 38lb – just awesome.

I topped the spot up with a couple of hundred boilies and got the rod back out… soon enough things started to happen and the bites came thick and fast throughout the trip, which for the lake I was on was just ridiculous action and in under 48hrs I ended up with 12 fish landed from 15 bites… What a session! I’ve been back again and had another awesome trip but I’m going to save that one for a other day…

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

A stunning mid-20.

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

One for next time…

Be Lucky

Jim

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When Your Luck’s In!

Posted by: Jim Wilson on July 15th, 2016

Following on from the capture of Arnie I was obviously keen to get out and try and capitalise on any run of luck I might have been experiencing, and my next set of days off saw me pointing the van south on the A1, heading in the direction of the notoriously deep Bundy’s pit. Now Bundy’s is an awesome place with an awesome stock, but boy they can be tricky carp to tempt if they don’t want to play ball. I arrived late-afternoon and spent a good journey of the drive down on the phone to my good mate Bailey, properly punishing him for the latest info.

On arrival I had a quick look round and a cuppa with the man himself, and then set about getting sorted. I went in a swim which has been kind to me in the past, and soon enough had the rods out on familiar ground, all three fished over a spread of Essential Cell and Hybrid.

It was knocking on dark by the time I was sorted so I sat near the rods taking in the atmosphere. It’s always nice to be back somewhere after a bit of a break, especially if you’ve been away since winter and when you come back its all green and lush.

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

Settled in The Boards.

The first night passed without event on the buzzer front, although I had forgotten how much the deep pit carp could show if they wanted to, and they didn’t half put on a show during the early hours, with probably 20 shows in front of me in an hour or so window. I’ve learnt by now not to get too carried away by this, or despondent if you don’t get a bite, because that’s the Bundy’s carp and its just how they behave some days.

By late morning I’d had enough so reeled the rods in then topped up the spots before heading off around the pit looking for signs of inspiration. It wasn’t long before I found fish, and where they were persuaded me I didn’t need to move swims, so a couple of hours later I had the rods back on the spots, about half an hour after casting I’d just clipped the bobbins on after letting the lines settle properly when the right hand rod pulled up tight and the rod tip slammed round. Shortly after, I had a gorgeous upper double common in the net. Nothing else happened until the early hours of the morning when a typical Bundy’s 20lb common graced my landing net. That was it for that session, and soon enough I was heading back to the deep pit for another 48hr session. This time I arrived early morning, not quite first light but early enough, and started to look round. It was Sunday morning so there were a few on and I decided to look and listen for a good while before making a decision.

There were fish all over the place so I got a couple of rods out in the swim I fished the trip before to see if I could buy a quick bite, but after a couple of hours I realised i was in the wrong place, and moved a couple of swims down to my left, again just fishing a couple of rods whilst I tried to figure out what was happening and what the fish were up to. Soon enough I realised another move was on the cards so loaded the X-Trail Galaxy Barrow and headed to Second Point, which was on the other side of the lake to the double swim where I was at the time. Once again, a couple of rods went out, however I couldn’t settle in the area so again went looking for them.

I moved once more, only this time back in the direction I had came from, settling on a swim called The Boards. It was now about half-three in the afternoon, and I’d arrived at half-five in the morning, it was baking hot and I was in my fourth swim of the day I was starting to feel it, but soon enough I had the rods out and the Tempest Brolly up and sorted for the night. The night was quiet, but around half-five the following morning the left hand rod pulled-up tight and a typical deep-water battle followed. The fight was slow and ponderous until eventually a great big common gulped for breath on the surface. Once in the folds of the net I knew she was a big girl, but didn’t have a clue which one it was, and eventually found out she was one that had been on the missing list for five years, and weighing-in at over 36lbs she truly was an awesome carp.

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

36lb of stunning deep-pit common!

That was that for that trip, and the following week the deep pit carp decided to spawn, so I left them to their copulation and ventured back to the snaggy pit, which is almost like my sanctuary. I love the place, the challenge and the atmosphere of the place are truly mesmerising.

After another stupidly early alarm clock following a busy week at work I was soon caffeine-fuelled and making my way towards the lake. Soon enough I was on lap three of the 50-60 acres of water, and having not seen a thing I returned to the van and dug out the brew kit, made a cuppa and sat and watched. After another hour-or-so of looking and a few cups of tea I decided to go afloat in search of them. I try not to use the boat if possible this time of year because the carp are very active and alert, and I find they spook quite easily when they are like this, so try and find them from the bank instead, but with nothing to go on I felt I had no option but to don the lifejacket and go afloat.

After a couple of laps of the likely areas from the boat I eventually found a group of fish, only 6-10 but that was enough for me, so I moored up to watch them. They were using a set of snags that it was impossible to fish to, so I eventually settled on a swim the other side of the snags and before sorting any of the gear I got the throwing stick out and baited each area I was looking to fish with a kilo-or-so of boilie.

I then sorted the rods, tied new rigs, attached new leadcore leaders and balanced off the hookbaits before flicking the rods to the spots. Soon enough I had the rods out and left them to let the braided line settle before attaching the bobbins. The rods were in the water about an hour before I went to clip the bobbins on when the right-hand rod literally pulled-up tight out of my hands! After an uneventful fight I soon had an absolute beast of a mirror safely in the folds of the landing net. Once the self-takes were done the scales revealed a very healthy weight of just over 38lb. What an awesome start to the session.

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

Over 38lb – just awesome.

I topped the spot up with a couple of hundred boilies and got the rod back out… soon enough things started to happen and the bites came thick and fast throughout the trip, which for the lake I was on was just ridiculous action and in under 48hrs I ended up with 12 fish landed from 15 bites… What a session! I’ve been back again and had another awesome trip but I’m going to save that one for a other day…

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

A stunning mid-20.

When Your Luck's In – Jim Wilson – Blog – Trakker

One for next time…

Be Lucky

Jim

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