Loz’s Bumper Blog – January/February 2017

Posted by: Trakker on February 21st, 2017

Loz’s Bumper Blog – January/February 2017

January

Over the festive period bank time became less of a priority, what with an increased workload, family commitments, and all the usual stuff that keeps us busy at this time of year. However, I was fortunate enough to find just enough time to squeeze in a social day session with a couple of mates, which saw us heading down to Drayton Reservoir in the hope of getting our strings pulled…

We turned up at the gate at first light to find that the majority of pegs that were producing fish had been taken, and in the end we had to settle for a couple of swims on the dam wall. Throughout the day it became apparent where the fish were shoaling up – and that wasn’t anywhere where we could even get close to! They were directly in the middle of the lake, which wouldn’t have been a problem had we been fishing from the point or the boards, but we were just off-centre of the dam wall.

Throughout the day I tried all manner of tactics from Zigs between 3ft-9ft, bottom baits, pop-ups and PVA bags, but it was quite clear we just weren’t on the shoal. I even took to spodding consistently for two and half hours to try and draw the fish in, but again this was to no success. In the end I opted to put two Zigs out at long range around the 130/140 yard mark, both set at at 6ft  with yellow foam hookbaits. The rods were as close to the central body of the lake as I could possibly get and by 14:00 the optimism had started to fade as myself and 15 other anglers on the wall hadn’t had so much as a liner.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

Zigs baited with yellow foam and fished at range were what eventually worked for me at Drayton.

I was just beginning to tidy a few things away for the journey back up North and my rod hand rod signalled a fast take on the Zig rig, but after five minutes or so of playing a hard-fighting carp, the hook pulled – hows your luck! Fortunately, the Drayton carp must have took pity on me, and within the last hour of fishing I managed nine takes and landed eight of them, it was as though a switch had been flicked. The long range Zig approach had finally came good and it was just a matter of being patient and waiting for the fish to drift into the area. It goes without saying that in any carp fishing situation, you can have the best bait and rig in the world, and even on a heavily-stocked water if you’re not on the fish you won’t catch them!

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A bite! Unfortunately this one fell off, but that wasn’t to be the last of the action…

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

The fish must have took pity on me!

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A Drayton mirror sulking in the Hydro!

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

Another hard-fighting Drayton mirror – this one weighing-in at 18lb.

After the semi-successful trip to Drayton the following two weekends saw me travelling looking for running water. We’ve had a harsh Janaury so far with cold temperatures at night freezing most lakes up and down the country.

One particular weekend I had a piece of filming with JAG booked at Bluebell Lakes in Peteborough, and fortunately Mallard Lake was half-free of ice, all be it at the shallow end of the lake. The filming was a success and after a couple of hours fishing Zigs in different swims, the lake slowly started to close up, and I decided to head back up the A1 for home.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

Doing a spot of filming for JAG.

Last weekend I decided to have a trip over to my new syndicate for the 2017 season, which I hope to start from the middle of March. The lakes were fairly free from ice and it gave me the opportunity to have a cast around with the marker to find a few areas which I could start introducing bait into. I plan to fish my winter club water throughout February and hopefully get a few more fish under my belt whilst having a weekly trip across to the syndicate to regualrly introduce bait into the areas ready for March. It may well be worth pointing out at this moment in time that I’m not putting in kilos and kilos on the spots, just 10 or 15 baits at a time to keep the smell in the area, and hopefully the carp will get used to seeing the bait there ready for my first session!


February

The beginning of February saw most lakes around my neck of the woods frozen. Ironically, with me holding-down a Monday-to-Friday job the weather mid-week seemed like early spring, but for some reason as soon as the weekend came around temperatures seemed to plummet well-below freezing. I did manage to get a few hours one morning before Sunday lunch to pop down to my local farm lake and wet a line. I managed four or five fish in the little time I had – nothing massive but it was enough to feed the habit whilst everywhere else thawed out.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A morning spent catching little ones down at my local farm pond was enough to keep the fire burning.

The following weekend myself and a good friend decided to take a return trip to Drayton Reservoir for the day in the hope that it wasn’t frozen. We arrived at the lake to find most of the decent pegs had already been taken and some of the lake still had a lid on it. Despite spending most of the day swapping and changing tactics to try and get a bite, it was obvious the fish were shoaled-up in the centre of the lake, and the guys two pegs down from us were getting bites every two or three hours. Just before the gates were due to close a peg became free further down that would give me access to the area where I knew the fish were holding up, and I wasted no time in moving in and casting two 6ft zigs at long range – around 130/140 yards – towards the middle. The move paid-off instantly and within 30 seconds of them being placed on the rests, both rods were away. Unfortunately I only managed to land one of the fish, which was around 13lb. It was such a relief not to blank – there were 52 anglers fishing this particular day and 48 blanked, proving just how crucial watercraft is.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

It was a relief not to blank on a day when the fish were playing hard ball.

With a sudden change in temperature and Spring seemingly upon us I decided to get a quick overnighter in on my club water at the end of the month. I arrived at the lake after work on a Friday afternoon around 15:00, and after a quick lap of the lake I had managed to find out that nothing had been seen for a while, let alone caught.Confident as ever I decided to have a walk up into the top bay of the lake where there was less pressure as the majority of anglers had set their stall out centrally. The bay had a nice south-easterly breeze blowing into it and with the recent drop in air pressure and slightly shallower water in the bay, I gathered some of the fish may have drifted into this quiet area, away from the bulk of the anglers. The peg offers access to a “no fishing” bank over on the far margin, which has around five-to-six feet of water on top of a bar, then as you pull the marker back towards the peg it drops-off to around 18ft in depth.

With the swim settled-on, up went the Tempest Composite Bivvy and I decided to put all three rods on different spots and cover as much of the bay as possible, with two rods being placed on top of of the bar in 8ft of water and the other in around 15ft. My rigs were my ever-faithful Multi-Rig, with two being baited with white pop-ups (white baits have produced most of my bites throughout the winter) and one on a yellow pop-up. Each rod had one Spomb-full of bait over the top of it, with my mix consisting of chopped Mainline Cell and Activ8 boilies, chick peas, Response Pellets and a sprinkling of corn. The mix was finshed with some of the IB Stick Mix Liquid over the top, and then added an extra squirt into the Spomb as I was filling it, just to try and introduce as much scent/attraction into the area as possible.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

My ‘winter mix’.

Just before sunset I thought I noticed a fish show 10 yards out to the left hand side of my swim. It came out on a spot I’d never seen them show over before, which caused me to spend the next five minutes staring intensely at the water, half expecting a tufty or a coot to pop up in the area, but it never did. Although I never actually saw the fish I was 90% sure it was one. I then looked back out towards the centre of the lake and over the next 30-minutes saw fish show regularly, which put doubt in my mind about the swim choice.

That doubt soon dissapeared as at 21:00 I had a drop-back on my right-hand rod and landed a lovely dark 23lb common. Safe to say, after a few weeks away from the lake and with rumours of how poor the fishing had been I was over the moon with that! Despite that bite nothing else materialised overnight and I was up just before first light to look for any signs of showing fish. After making myself a brew a fish head-and-shouldered to my left, 10 yards over the same spot as Friday. I quickly wound my left hand rod in, and as the rig approached the rings left by the disturbance had made I stopped selling and felt it down into around 18ft of water.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A drop-back on the right-hander resulted in this 23lb common.

Before I’d even managed to clip my bobbin on I’d had a powerful take which pulled the line out my hands! It resulted in a double-figure common which I unhooked in the net, and the rig was put straight back out on the spot to try to maximise my chances of another take. Almost as soon as I had let the little common go, the rod was away again and another small common was again the culprit. By this time I was cursing myself as to why I never put a rod there last night! Around an hour later the same rod was away again and this time it felt like a better fish. After a 5-minute tussle I had a lovely 21lb mirror in its winter colours lying in the folds of my Hydro, which I carefully lifted from the water and unhooked before placing in the Sanctuary Retention Sling so again I could reposition the rod on what was turning out to be “the hotspot”.
Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A lovely mirror of 23lb.

Despite the flurry of activity, that was the last of the action for me. I’d been given the green light to stay another night but I decided that one night in the winter was enough, and opted to build up the Brownie points until Spring really arrives.

Be lucky

Loz

Leave a Reply





Loz’s Bumper Blog – January/February 2017

Posted by: Trakker on February 21st, 2017

Loz’s Bumper Blog – January/February 2017

January

Over the festive period bank time became less of a priority, what with an increased workload, family commitments, and all the usual stuff that keeps us busy at this time of year. However, I was fortunate enough to find just enough time to squeeze in a social day session with a couple of mates, which saw us heading down to Drayton Reservoir in the hope of getting our strings pulled…

We turned up at the gate at first light to find that the majority of pegs that were producing fish had been taken, and in the end we had to settle for a couple of swims on the dam wall. Throughout the day it became apparent where the fish were shoaling up – and that wasn’t anywhere where we could even get close to! They were directly in the middle of the lake, which wouldn’t have been a problem had we been fishing from the point or the boards, but we were just off-centre of the dam wall.

Throughout the day I tried all manner of tactics from Zigs between 3ft-9ft, bottom baits, pop-ups and PVA bags, but it was quite clear we just weren’t on the shoal. I even took to spodding consistently for two and half hours to try and draw the fish in, but again this was to no success. In the end I opted to put two Zigs out at long range around the 130/140 yard mark, both set at at 6ft  with yellow foam hookbaits. The rods were as close to the central body of the lake as I could possibly get and by 14:00 the optimism had started to fade as myself and 15 other anglers on the wall hadn’t had so much as a liner.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

Zigs baited with yellow foam and fished at range were what eventually worked for me at Drayton.

I was just beginning to tidy a few things away for the journey back up North and my rod hand rod signalled a fast take on the Zig rig, but after five minutes or so of playing a hard-fighting carp, the hook pulled – hows your luck! Fortunately, the Drayton carp must have took pity on me, and within the last hour of fishing I managed nine takes and landed eight of them, it was as though a switch had been flicked. The long range Zig approach had finally came good and it was just a matter of being patient and waiting for the fish to drift into the area. It goes without saying that in any carp fishing situation, you can have the best bait and rig in the world, and even on a heavily-stocked water if you’re not on the fish you won’t catch them!

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A bite! Unfortunately this one fell off, but that wasn’t to be the last of the action…

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

The fish must have took pity on me!

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A Drayton mirror sulking in the Hydro!

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

Another hard-fighting Drayton mirror – this one weighing-in at 18lb.

After the semi-successful trip to Drayton the following two weekends saw me travelling looking for running water. We’ve had a harsh Janaury so far with cold temperatures at night freezing most lakes up and down the country.

One particular weekend I had a piece of filming with JAG booked at Bluebell Lakes in Peteborough, and fortunately Mallard Lake was half-free of ice, all be it at the shallow end of the lake. The filming was a success and after a couple of hours fishing Zigs in different swims, the lake slowly started to close up, and I decided to head back up the A1 for home.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

Doing a spot of filming for JAG.

Last weekend I decided to have a trip over to my new syndicate for the 2017 season, which I hope to start from the middle of March. The lakes were fairly free from ice and it gave me the opportunity to have a cast around with the marker to find a few areas which I could start introducing bait into. I plan to fish my winter club water throughout February and hopefully get a few more fish under my belt whilst having a weekly trip across to the syndicate to regualrly introduce bait into the areas ready for March. It may well be worth pointing out at this moment in time that I’m not putting in kilos and kilos on the spots, just 10 or 15 baits at a time to keep the smell in the area, and hopefully the carp will get used to seeing the bait there ready for my first session!


February

The beginning of February saw most lakes around my neck of the woods frozen. Ironically, with me holding-down a Monday-to-Friday job the weather mid-week seemed like early spring, but for some reason as soon as the weekend came around temperatures seemed to plummet well-below freezing. I did manage to get a few hours one morning before Sunday lunch to pop down to my local farm lake and wet a line. I managed four or five fish in the little time I had – nothing massive but it was enough to feed the habit whilst everywhere else thawed out.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A morning spent catching little ones down at my local farm pond was enough to keep the fire burning.

The following weekend myself and a good friend decided to take a return trip to Drayton Reservoir for the day in the hope that it wasn’t frozen. We arrived at the lake to find most of the decent pegs had already been taken and some of the lake still had a lid on it. Despite spending most of the day swapping and changing tactics to try and get a bite, it was obvious the fish were shoaled-up in the centre of the lake, and the guys two pegs down from us were getting bites every two or three hours. Just before the gates were due to close a peg became free further down that would give me access to the area where I knew the fish were holding up, and I wasted no time in moving in and casting two 6ft zigs at long range – around 130/140 yards – towards the middle. The move paid-off instantly and within 30 seconds of them being placed on the rests, both rods were away. Unfortunately I only managed to land one of the fish, which was around 13lb. It was such a relief not to blank – there were 52 anglers fishing this particular day and 48 blanked, proving just how crucial watercraft is.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

It was a relief not to blank on a day when the fish were playing hard ball.

With a sudden change in temperature and Spring seemingly upon us I decided to get a quick overnighter in on my club water at the end of the month. I arrived at the lake after work on a Friday afternoon around 15:00, and after a quick lap of the lake I had managed to find out that nothing had been seen for a while, let alone caught.Confident as ever I decided to have a walk up into the top bay of the lake where there was less pressure as the majority of anglers had set their stall out centrally. The bay had a nice south-easterly breeze blowing into it and with the recent drop in air pressure and slightly shallower water in the bay, I gathered some of the fish may have drifted into this quiet area, away from the bulk of the anglers. The peg offers access to a “no fishing” bank over on the far margin, which has around five-to-six feet of water on top of a bar, then as you pull the marker back towards the peg it drops-off to around 18ft in depth.

With the swim settled-on, up went the Tempest Composite Bivvy and I decided to put all three rods on different spots and cover as much of the bay as possible, with two rods being placed on top of of the bar in 8ft of water and the other in around 15ft. My rigs were my ever-faithful Multi-Rig, with two being baited with white pop-ups (white baits have produced most of my bites throughout the winter) and one on a yellow pop-up. Each rod had one Spomb-full of bait over the top of it, with my mix consisting of chopped Mainline Cell and Activ8 boilies, chick peas, Response Pellets and a sprinkling of corn. The mix was finshed with some of the IB Stick Mix Liquid over the top, and then added an extra squirt into the Spomb as I was filling it, just to try and introduce as much scent/attraction into the area as possible.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

My ‘winter mix’.

Just before sunset I thought I noticed a fish show 10 yards out to the left hand side of my swim. It came out on a spot I’d never seen them show over before, which caused me to spend the next five minutes staring intensely at the water, half expecting a tufty or a coot to pop up in the area, but it never did. Although I never actually saw the fish I was 90% sure it was one. I then looked back out towards the centre of the lake and over the next 30-minutes saw fish show regularly, which put doubt in my mind about the swim choice.

That doubt soon dissapeared as at 21:00 I had a drop-back on my right-hand rod and landed a lovely dark 23lb common. Safe to say, after a few weeks away from the lake and with rumours of how poor the fishing had been I was over the moon with that! Despite that bite nothing else materialised overnight and I was up just before first light to look for any signs of showing fish. After making myself a brew a fish head-and-shouldered to my left, 10 yards over the same spot as Friday. I quickly wound my left hand rod in, and as the rig approached the rings left by the disturbance had made I stopped selling and felt it down into around 18ft of water.

Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A drop-back on the right-hander resulted in this 23lb common.

Before I’d even managed to clip my bobbin on I’d had a powerful take which pulled the line out my hands! It resulted in a double-figure common which I unhooked in the net, and the rig was put straight back out on the spot to try to maximise my chances of another take. Almost as soon as I had let the little common go, the rod was away again and another small common was again the culprit. By this time I was cursing myself as to why I never put a rod there last night! Around an hour later the same rod was away again and this time it felt like a better fish. After a 5-minute tussle I had a lovely 21lb mirror in its winter colours lying in the folds of my Hydro, which I carefully lifted from the water and unhooked before placing in the Sanctuary Retention Sling so again I could reposition the rod on what was turning out to be “the hotspot”.
Loz's Bumper Blog – Trakker

A lovely mirror of 23lb.

Despite the flurry of activity, that was the last of the action for me. I’d been given the green light to stay another night but I decided that one night in the winter was enough, and opted to build up the Brownie points until Spring really arrives.

Be lucky

Loz

Leave a Reply